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Tech News Hub: WEEKLY NEWS ROUNDUP


At Tech News Hub, we are delighted to share another session of Tech News Hub: Weekly News Roundup. It is a place where we summarise our weekly coverings in a small form to learn the happenings on one page.



The US is stepping up critical infrastructure protection against Russian cyberattacks, starting with the UK. The current situation around the globe is pretty harsh as we are still recovering from the pandemic. Many lost loved ones in the coronavirus, and even before we were retrieved from the immersible loss, a war started.


Global leaders came together to protect people falling under war-affected territories. Alongside that, in a place where a tiny number of people notice, cyberattacks are taking place. "Conspiracies" are becoming true, making the horrifying dream a reality. Check out the main article to learn more about the critical infrastructure protection against Russian cyberattacks.


Software consultancy firm Globant went through another breach. Popular hacking group LAPSUS$ was also behind Microsoft, Okta, Samsung, and Nvidia breaches, making Globant their newest target. The hacking group sourced at least 70GB of data from the firm and shared it on their Telegram channel. More than two dozen folders were seen on the track, upon which Globant responded positively. It took them nearly 24 hours to get back running with regular operation.


This week, we placed a keen eye on one of the top service providers. Hewlett Packard Enterprise (NYSE: HPE) introduced GreenLake Aruba NaaS services (network-as-a-service), among many others.


NaaS services are currently high in demand, and the new GreenLake Aruba will help customers satisfy their needs with the same subscription. GreenLake has over 120,000 customers with more than two million devices connected. We shared the IDC report alongside the GreenLake Aruba's first appeared under HPE. Please check out the full story to learn more.


Our fourth story is an eye-opener regarding the ongoing popularity of ransomware. Cybersecurity startup Lumu technology talked about "precursor malware" as an entry point for ransomware. The increasing number is quite devastating if we look back at the stats.

From 2018 to last year, 19.4 per cent to 71.6 per cent of companies paid ransom to recover their data. This gives us an idea of successful ransomware attacks. The Precursor variant enterers the network and keeps security personnel busy with decoy alerts.


While they are working on the alert, the malware spreads through the system and becomes ransomware. In our story, we talked about it in detail. If you run or work at a company with networked resources, we urge you to look at the whole story.


The fifth weekly story was regarding "MTI's contingency plans after SunGard UK announced insolvency." Subscription tier pricing modules impact the business model of companies. While tech companies primarily adopt the technique, MTI (a Ricoh Company) focuses on an "uninterrupted supply of services to all customers." Check out our full story to learn more.


Our sixth story was regarding the victory or general labours of Amazon. The Staten Island warehouse workers of Amazon voted to unionise the Amazon Labor Union. While Amazon said they are "disappointed with the election outcome in Staten Island", the employees are pretty happy. Amazon is the second-largest private employer in the US. The move marks a day of victory for general workers. Among two votes under the Amazon title, the Staten Island one kept the crown. Check the whole story to learn more.


Last but not least, our weekly covering ended with Russian president Vladimir Putin banning software imports for its critical infrastructure. The document is attached with the main article.

While the country is undergoing sanctions, piracy has been given a new life. Digital products are being pirated on a large scale, which is obvious, as it has been practised for a long time. From January 1st, 2025, the country will stop importing software and scripts coming with equipment and digital services. The government is given authority to adopt within six months to the change.


Here's the last week's Tech News Hub: Weekly News Roundup.

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